Foundation, Inc.

Helping us end children poverty

To win the fight on children poverty, communities must have the skills to succeed in a fair-minded place of work. To accomplish this, the organization has created programs to help working families & single mothers, and prepare our youth to become self sufficient successful people within the worldwide economy. We are consistently creating technical and clerical support for blooming rural communities. In addition to motivating your resources, we are establishing exclusive programs to encourage economic development and financial freedom. The organization has developed an initiative that supports goals centered around revitalizing our communities. This motivate your resources approach is particularly important in rural areas given their limited assets, current circumstances and the growing need to growing need for access to programs that enhance their skills & abilities that are important to their overall development in society.

Peaches and Cream

           267-888-5099


Find us:

Headquarters

1250 Point Breeze Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19146

                                        Call us: (267) 888-5099


Locations: 

​Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Alabama, Georgia,
South Carolina, North Carolina, & Florida.


Peaches and Cream Foundation does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, color, sex, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, sexual orientation, gender identity and/or expression, or disability.

Copyright © 2013. Peaches and Cream Foundation All rights reserved.

Conclusion

Peaches and Cream Foundation will continue to providing services that focus on rural areas.  Rural America continues to be a source of opportunity for both the people who live there and for the nation as a whole. It possesses substantial natural resources, a diverse culture, and a strong family oriented structure. Still,  in too many rural/tribal places, families and children are falling behind.  Our study describes ways to measure rural poverty and sets out a number of concerning developments. This research underlines many of the critical programs lifting millions of rural children and families out of poverty. It truly emphasizes the need to do more. Rural children enter Kindergarten underprepared, are less likely to receive preventative medical & mental health care, and are more deprived of food. All of these things have dramatic and lasting impacts on life outcomes. At the same time, parents are less likely to have received postsecondary education and advanced skills training. This has limited their ability to compete for good-paying jobs in the ever-changing economy. In rural, urban, or suburban communities, the road to the middle class is the same: education, healthcare, jobs. Our organization will promote the need of new policies that must adapt and respond to the distinct challenges facing rural and tribal communities. There are too many deprived children living in rural America that face similar educational, social & economic barriers as their urban counterparts. Many of these problems are weakened by the exclusion and limited access to support services commonly experienced in rural areas. As the record states in the past, we have made extensive progress in ending child poverty. The organization aims to build upon this progress by building new partnerships, leveraging technology, and exploring new models of program delivery ensuring that all children have an opportunity to succeed.

Help Us End Child Poverty " In Loving Memory of Seth A. Joyal"

The Rural Community

Children that live in rural community areas often lack access to key amenities and  critical programs or services that help families thrive. For example, while  3 percent of children in urban areas lack access to parks, libraries, or sidewalks, 6 percent of children in large rural areas and 8 percent in small rural areas do not have access to these amenities. Recognizing the lack of brick & mortar infrastructure to support service delivery in rural places, the FY2016 Budget provides $56 million in grants through the USDA Community Facilities Program, which makes investments in hospitals, schools, and other essential facilities.